Dia de la Candelaria!

Celebrating “candlemas” with friends in family this 02. of February!

This celebration normally follows the “Rosca de Reyes” celebration from the 06. of January. This day originally goes back to the presentation of Jesus at the temple for the first time!

In Mexico people dress up a little Jesus doll and take it to their churches for a blessing by the priest. Then the little jesus doll gets exhibited at home!

We do not dress up the doll … but come together in the evening to have TAMALES with family and friends. Normally the same group that met on the 06. of January!

Tamales and hot chocolate …. well and some red wine!

Tamales in Mexico (from wikipedia)

In Mexico, tamales begin with a dough made from nixtamalized corn (hominy), called masa, or a masa mix such as Maseca and lard or vegetable shortening. Tamales are generally wrapped in corn husks or plantain leaves before cooking, depending on the region from which they come. They usually have a sweet or savory filling and are usually steamed until firm.
Tamales are a favorite comfort food in Mexico, eaten as both breakfast and dinner, and often accompanied by hot Atole or Champurrado, maize-based beverages of indigenous origin. Street vendors can be seen serving them from huge, steaming, covered pots (tamaleras).
In Mexico City, the tamal is substantial enough to keep a person satisfid until Mexico’s traditional late lunch hour.
The most common fillings are pork and chicken, in either red or green salsa or mole. Another very traditional variation is to add pink colored sugar to the corn mix and fill it with raisins or other dried fruit and make a sweet tamal (tamal de dulce). There are commonly a few “deaf”, or filling-less, tamales (tamal sordo), which might be served with refried beans and coffee.
The cooking of tamales is traditionally done in batches of tens if not hundreds, and the ratio of filling to dough (and the coarseness of the filling) is a matter of discretion.
Instead of corn husks, banana or plantain leaves are used in tropical parts of the country such as Oaxaca, Chiapas, Veracruz, and the Yucatán Peninsula. These tamales are rather square in shape, often very large— 15 inches (40 cm) or more— and thick; a local name for these in Southern Tamaulipas is Zacahuil. Another less-common variation is to use chard leaves or avacado leaves, which can be eaten along with the filling.
Tamales became one of the representatives of Mexican culinary tradition in Europe, being one of the first samples of the culture that the Spanish conquistadors took back to Spain as proof of civilization, according to Fray Juan de Zumarraga.
Today, tamales are often eaten during festivities, such as Christmas, the Day of the Dead, Las Posadas, La Candelaria Day (February 2) and Mexican Independence Day.

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